Abandonment is the most common ground to terminate parental rights (TPR) in Connecticut. If a parent is filing the TPR it starts in the Probate Court.  If DCF is involved, the TPR is filed in the local Juvenile Court.  Whenever a TPR is filed, the Probate Court or Juvenile will request that DCF conduct s…

There are eight grounds for a termination of parental rights in Connecticut. The three most common are: 1. Abandonment. This occurs when a parent has abandoned the child by failing to maintain a reasonable degree of interest, concern or responsibility as to the welfare of their child. 2. Failure to rehabilitate. Rehabilitation refers to whether…

Probate Courts have exclusive jurisdiction to handle stepparent adoption in Connecticut. We know that many stepparents have a parent like relationship with their spouse’s child. They spend lots of time together and do all the things those parents and children enjoy. The child loves and trusts the stepparent and even calls them “mom” or “dad.”…

The termination of parental rights in Connecticut often involve claims of abandonment.  A lack of an ongoing parent-child relationship is also frequently claimed as a ground when abandonment is alleged. Makes sense in that there is considerable factual overlap between these two concepts. There are two prongs to the claim of no ongoing parent-child relationship….

There are eight grounds to terminate parental rights in Connecticut Probate Court. In my experience, the most common is abandonment. By definition, abandonment occurs when a parent has failed to maintain a reasonable degree of interest, concern or responsibility as to the welfare of their child. They key word is “maintain” since the parent must…

These are the most common grounds to terminate parental rights in Connecticut: 1. Abandonment. This occurs when a parent has abandoned the child by failing to maintain a reasonable degree of interest, concern or responsibility as to the welfare of their child. 2. Failure to rehabilitate. Rehabilitation refers to whether or not the parent has…

Probate Courts in Connecticut have exclusive jurisdiction to handle stepparent adoptions. We know that many stepparents have a parent like relationship with their spouse’s child. They spend lots of time together and do all the things those parents and children enjoy. The child loves and trusts the stepparent and even calls them “mom” or “dad.”…

Filing Termination of Parental Rights in Connecticut? There must be legally sufficient grounds for a judge to terminate parental rights in Connecticut. In my opinion, here are the strongest: 1. Abandonment. This occurs when a parent has failed to maintain a reasonable degree of interest, concern or responsibility as to the welfare of their child….

An open adoption provides for some form of ongoing contact between a child and his/her biological parents after an adoption has been granted by the Probate Court or Juvenile Court. In Connecticut, open adoption agreements may be governed by Connecticut General Statutes Section 17a-112 or may be based on strict contract principles – referred to…

There are six grounds to terminate parental rights in Connecticut. The three most common are: 1. Abandonment. This occurs when a parent has abandoned the child by failing to maintain a reasonable degree of interest, concern or responsibility as to the welfare of their child. 2. Failure to rehabilitate. Rehabilitation refers to whether or not…

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