Larceny in Connecticut Juvenile Court can have serious consequences. Connecticut law defines larceny as occurring when a person wrongfully takes, obtains, or withholds someone else’s property with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of the property, or to appropriate it to a third person. (Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 53a-119). Common examples include: shoplifting….

  As of January 1,2017, the Juvenile Probation Department is required to conduct a Juvenile Detention Risk Assessment of all detained juveniles.  The Assessment will be used by Juvenile Court judges to determine whether or not a child should be released pending resolution of their delinquency charges. The purpose is to measure a child’s risk…

For a Juvenile Court to sustain (continue) a DCF order of temporary custody (OTC), it must find that DCF proved, by a fair preponderance of the evidence, that a minor child would be subjected to immediate physical danger, if returned to the custody of a parent. DCF Order of Temporary Custody Lawyer A recent case…

Revisions to Connecticut Juvenile Detention law will take effect on January 1, 2017. This is good news for juvenile justice advocates who long argued for reform. Here is a brief summary: No child may be detained after a hearing unless the court determines that: There is probable cause to believe that the child has committed…

Protective Supervision is one the options a Connecticut Juvenile Court judge has after making a finding of neglect.   The neglect finding is made wither when a parent pleads “no contest” or after a full trial on the allegations in the DCF Neglect Petition.  If there is no finding of neglect, then Protective Supervision cannot…

DCF Commitment of a child means that custody and guardianship of a child is transferred to DCF. For a child to be committed to DCF, there must be two separate court findings Adjudication of the Neglect Petition.   A Juvenile Court judge must find that the child was neglected, abused or uncared for.  This can…

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